vCloud Director 5.1.1, vCloud Networking and Security 5.1.1, ESXi 5.1.0a, vCenter 5.1.0a Released!


Looks like my proof of concept environment is out of date already…

VMware released a couple of updates on Thursday 25/10/2012:

  • VMware ESXi 5.1.0a Build 838463 –  Download

Looks like there are a couple of new features in vCloud Director like Elastic vDCs which will be worth looking into, but otherwise its all bug fixes.

I haven’t been having any issues per se, so not sure how much value I will get out of these updates, but will hopefully get these installed next week to ensure I am up to date with the latest patches and try play around with the new vCloud Director features.

 

Advertisements

Shame on you VMware! Shame on you!


VMware, I am not impressed.

Guess the release date of SQL Server 2008 R2 SP1 for me, will ya?

I’ll give you a hint… Since it has only just been approved for use with vSphere 5.1, you’d hazard a guess recently, right?

Wrong!

SQL 2008 R2 SP1 was released in 11th July 2011. Date approved by VMware: 10th September 2012 (vSphere 5.1 release date).

Come on VMware… seriously? 14 months to approve a SQL service pack? That’s a joke.

I recently found out our administrators had applied SP1 to our SQL 2008 R2 servers earlier this year, when I tried to raise a support call and it was pointed out we were actually outside the VMware matrix.

I had to uninstall SP1 (thank you Microsoft for including this feature in SQL 2008 R2!) to get us back in line with the VMware compatibility matrix. The uninstall went quite smoothly (thank you again Microsoft) but that’s not really the point is it…

I’m running vSphere 5 Update 1 but I cannot apply SQL 2008 R2 SP1 or even SP2 because VMware are being slack!

Someone needs to up their game or loosen the compatibility matrix.

VMware Product Compatibility Matrix


This is the best website since sliced bread and I felt an irresistible urge to share it with y’all.

I am talking of course about the VMware Product Interoperabillity Matrix.

A bit of a mouthful but with this little beauty you can work out exactly what dependencies there are between VMware products.

Q. Planning to upgrade your ESXi hypervisor and worried about the impact this will have on your other VMware products like vCenter, vShield, VUM, SRM?

A. No problem, just check the product interoperability matrix!

Q. Want to install vCenter but not sure which versions of SQL are supported?

A. No problem, just check the product interoperability matrix!

You get the idea…

If you have never had a look before, I recommend you perform a quick review of your environment. You may be surprised to see you are out of the matrix (like I did!)

vShield Endpoint Driver BSOD issue


The vShield Endpoint driver is back in the bad books this week.

Looks like it is now causing our virtual machines to blue screen. grrrrr

If its not an issue with Trend Micro Deep Security, its an issue with vShield Endpoint!

This affected our Citrix Xenapp Provisioned Services Servers quite severely. They were blue screening every day. This has only affected one of our standard virtual machines – a file server crashed during the day the other week.

This will affect anyone using the latest officially released vShield driver 5.0.0.1 build-652273 and older versions.

This issue is confirmed by VMware to be fixed in a new version of the vShield Endpoint driver 5.0.0.2 build-813867 — another reason to contact VMware  to get your hands on this driver as it has not been officially released yet.

 

New vShield Endpoint Driver available to improve Deep Security 8 performance


Thanks to http://www.joulupukki.nl/wordpress/?p=523 for alerting me to this issue.

VMware made a pre release of the new vShield Endpoint Driver (5.0.0.2 build-813867) available last week to customers who are experiencing issues with their current vShield Driver. This will be released in Q4 but if you are using an anti malware product in your virtual environment that relies on vShield Endpoint Driver I would contact VMware to get the patch.

This hotfix needs to be applied on top of vShield Endpoint Driver build 652273 which is available with the VMware tools included with ESXi 5 Express Patch 3 (build 702118).

In the words of VMware this fixes two main issues: performance issues with network files and sharing violation issues.

1. Sharing violations – It was discovered that, while you had the thin agent installed and real-time AV scanning running, if you opened a file on a network share a few times in quick succession, the 3rd or 4th attempt could result in the file being locked. This was due to the lack of caching for network files, which is the recommend AV practice, but caused this locking

2. Performance issues – This was to due to the general overhead when our thin agent called some MS filter methods.

I also found that this version fixes a BSOD issue with vsepflt.sys. More about that in my next post.

vBlock Tip: Increase Cisco 1000V Max Ports from default of 32


Another post in the vBlock tip series…

VCE use static binding on the Cisco 1000V and this combined with the default of 32 ports per VLAN means most people will soon run out of ports on their DV port groups.

Who knows why 32 is the default. It seems a bit conservative to me. Maybe there is a global port limit but I haven’t been able to confirm this.

Either way, 32 doesn’t seem nearly enough ports in most network designs. The good news is the maximum is 1024, so it makes sense to me to increase it substantially depending on the number of VLANs you have.

As soon as your vBlock lands I would definitely review each DV Port Group and increase the max ports assigned.

Static binding is a pain in the arse – it means that any VM whether a template or whether its powered off will use up a port if it is assigned to the DV Port Group. You may only have 5x running VMs on the VLAN but you won’t be able to add and power on a 6th VM if you have 27x VMs\templates powered off and assigned to that same DV Port Group.

For that reason alone I am not sure why VCE don’t just use ephemeral binding. Anyway I am going off topic.

Instructions from VMware KB1035819 on how to increase your max ports for each VLAN (port-profile).

These are the commands I use:

  1. show port-profile – to find the correct port profile name
  2. conf t – enter configuration
  3. port-profile <DV-port-group-name> – change configuration context to the correct port-profile
  4. vmware max-ports 64 – change max ports to 64
  5. copy run start – copy running config to startup config
  6. exit
  7. exit
  8. exit